Leica Microsystems

Nobel Prize

Prof. Dr. Stefan Hell is awarded the top scientific distinction for the principle that enables STED microscopy. And Leica Microsystems played quite a significant part in this revolution.

3D GSDIM image of a COS-7 cell. (Image: Leica Microsystems)
3D GSDIM image of a COS-7 cell. (Image: Leica Microsystems)

On October 8th, Stefan Hell at the Max Planck Institute of Biophysical Chemistry in Göttingen received the sensational news that he, Eric Betzig and William E. Moerner had won the 2014 Nobel Prize for Chemistry. All three have played a decisive role in advancing the development of super-resolution fluorescence microscopy. Prof. Dr. Stefan Hell is specifically honored for the principle that enables STED (STimulated Emission Depletion) microscopy. His developments of 4Pi and STED microscopy were turned into the first commercial super-resolution microscopes by Leica Microsystems in 2004 and 2007.

Marcus Dyba, who developed the first STED microscope during his PhD thesis in Stefan Hell’s lab and is now a project leader for the development of super-resolution technologies at Leica Microsystems, says: “I am happy that the Nobel Committee recognizes the pioneering work of Stefan Hell, because this really triggered a revolution in light microscopy”. And Leica Microsystems played quite a significant part in this revolution.

 

Additional Information:

www.leica-microsystems.com